Traditional Rib Roast

Background/Info:

The rib roast comes from the section between the chuck and the shortloin. On one end is the chuck, and on the other is the new york. It consists of 7 ribs (used to be 8, until the packing houses realized they could get more money by leaving that rib on the shortloin, which sells for a higher price). As it runs from the chuck down, the diameter thins – a 3-rib roast cut from the chuck end will have a dramatically different look to it than a 3-rib roast cut from the loin end. Each end will have its different advantages – the chuck end has a higher percentage of rib cap, while the loin end will have less internal fat.

ribroast

These are two ends of the exact same piece. You can see how the rib cap starts heavy on the chuck end, but it thins out to a barely percetiple edge on the loin end. 

Pros/Cons:

The rib roast is hands down the most dramatic of all roasts, and the most traditional holiday roast. An entire 7-rib roast will weight between 16-17lbs, and will serve approx 14 people, which is more than you can get with any other single roast. On the flip side, because of the large diameter of the rib roasts, each slice will be a little more difficult to portion for some of the smaller eaters. Additionally, it can be slightly tricky to carve the bones. It also has the longest cooking time.

Tips & Tricks:

If you know a rib roast is right for you, you’ll want to figure you need approx 1lb of roast per every serving. Another way to look at it is to figure 2 or 3 people per rib, depending on appetite. For any of you who aren’t getting your roast from us, we’ve got words for you. But not the kind you might be thinking – here are some great tips if you’re buying your roast local. If you can’t find any Dry Aged rib roasts, the next mot important thing you want to look for is the marbling. A great piece of meat has fine flecks of marbling running through it, try to avoid pieces with very heavy chunks, as this results in an uneven eating experience. If any of you are heading to Costco type stores to get your roast, you’ve got a good chance of finding a decent piece if you know what to look for. Check out the marbling from the loin end of the rib (that’s going to be the end that looks ‘flatter’ than the other end). If you use your finger to carefully stretch out the plastic packaging, you can get a better look at the meat itself, and how good the marbling is.  

 

Club Roast

Background/Info:

Right where the rib roast stops is the start of the Loin, where the New York is cut from. If you think of a Rib Roast as a bunch of bone-in ribeyes stuck together, the Club Roast is a bunch of boneless new yorks left together. Unlike the rib roast, the entire new york strip does not change too dramatically from one end to the other. You will not have a significant visual or taste difference between one end of the club roast versus the other, it’s a very uniform piece. 

newyork

You can see that there really is very little diameter difference between one end of the New York towards the other. This particular piece is untrimmed; apart from more trimming needed from the Sirloin End, both sides are ver similar. 

Pros/Cons:  

I know it’s going to sound crazy, but I honestly can’t think of any serious cons to the Club Roast. Probably the only thing would be that the presentation isn’t as dramatic as a rib roast, but apart from that, it’s a phenomenal cut. When slicing, you will get consistently uniform portions, and there aren’t any bones to carve around. Each slice will run approx 8-10oz, giving you very versatile portions. Another great aspect of it is that all of the fat runs along the outer edge, you won’t run into any internal fat on this piece. The cooking time is quicker than a rib roast, but slightly longer than for a tenderloin roast or rib cap roast.

Tips & Tricks:

When ordering, figure that you’ll need about ¾ of a pound per serving. 

 

Tenderloin Roast

Background/Info:

The key to the tenderloin roast is right in its name – “tender”. Hands down this is the most tender of all roasts, and all steak cuts for that matter. Nestled next to the New York, the key to what makes the filet so tender is that it is a muscle that is mostly unused during the life of the animal.

psmo

For our CA Tenderloin Roast, we remove both Tail and Butt ends to give a true Center Cut Roast

Pros/Cons:  

Because we all know it’s impossible to have it all, the tenderloin roast does have some shortfalls. This roast will have the least amount of flavor of all other cuts. Being such a lean cut, there isn’t enough fat to really inject it with the decadent flavors you’ll find on the Rib Roast or Rib Cap. Because of this, the tenderloin roasts act as a fantastic blank slate for any accompanying sauces. This lack of fat is seen as a significant “pro” by many people, however. The smaller diameter to this roast will allow you smaller portion sizes when sliced. A slice from a tenderloin roast will weigh approx 4-6oz, versus the 12-16oz portion you’ll see cut from a Rib Roast.  It will cook faster than other roast options requiring only 35-45 min in the oven.

Tips & Tricks:

You won’t run into any lost weight from bones or fat on this roast, so it’s safe to assume you’ll need ½ pound per serving. 

 

Rib Cap Roast

Background/Info:

We do a lot of talking about the Rib Cap around here, and with good reason. I’m convinced that the rib cap is without a doubt, the single most flavorful cut of meat. Officially known as the “Spinalis Dorsi” muscle, the rib cap is the outer ‘cap’ that sits on the prime rib. As it runs from the chuck end of the rib toward the loin end, the thickness of the muscle tapers from approx 2” thick to a point. In order to give the cut a uniform thickness, which you need for proper cooking, we roll the cap and tie it with butchers twine. After cooking, you’ll cut the twine and slice to serve.  

ribcap

The "Flat" Ribcap is what the cut looks like when it is pulled off the rib. You can see the heavy layer of fat towards the Chuck End (on the left). There is also a lot of sinew that gets removed before it is rolled and tied into the Rib Cap Roast. 

Pros/Cons:

The obvious pro here is flavor. Followed by more flavor. If you’ve got anyone coming to dinner who claims to know what phenomenal beef tastes like, serve this. The Rib Cap Roast has a similar shape to the Tenderloin Roast, so the cooking time will also be a manageable 45min or so. The cons to this cut are that some people find it too rich (I’ve tried referring those people to psychiatrists to no avail), and the presentation isn’t as elegant as a Tenderloin Roast or Club Roast.

Tips & Tricks:

The crazy tip that we give to anyone going with the Rib Cap is to overcook it. Now hear me out first. The cap has a very unique texture, unlike any other cut. Being so rich, it is softer than the heart of the ribeye, or a new york. To avoid it retaining too much of that soft mouthfeel, you want to cook it past rare, and go into medium well done terriorty. Once here, the texture firms up, and you enter a fifth dimension. Seriously, trust me on this one. Most  prefer to sear this roast to give a good crust, but it will also be sperb without searing.   

 

Boneless Ribeye Roast

Background/Info:

You’re going to have the same basic info on the boneless ribeye roast as you have on the traditional rib roast. The obvious difference between the two is that the ribs are removed from this roast.

Pros/Cons:  

This section will also be similar to the rib roast. Depending on who you ask, it could be either a pro or a con that the bones are removed from this roast. While I disagree with the notion that the bones impart flavor during cooking (unless you’re braising, but I can get into that later when we focus on short ribs), I personally love having the bones to gnaw on. When the wife’s not looking, of course.  The same cons will exist – you have the most amount of internal fat with ribeyes.

ribeye

This shows the middle of the Ribeye - you can get a better visual here of what we mean when we refer to the internal fat of Ribeyes/Rib Roasts. 

Tips & Tricks:

If you're looking for both the benefit of a Boneless Rib Roast as well as having the bones to chew on, we've got you covered - have the ribs removed and tied back on. We’ll be happy to do this for you or if you are shopping locally, ask your local butcher to do this for you (just don’t tell them it was our suggestion…they’ll hate us for it). For those of you who have ever struggled when carving the cooked roast, this is the answer. When done properly, you can’t even tell that the ribs have been separated. The cooking process will be exactly the same and there will be no loss of juice because the ribs are seating back exactly where they were and will seal the roast while cooking. When done, simply cut the strings and lift off the meat… Voila! you have a boneless roast to slice and the ribs will be fully cooked and servable if desired.  You will also find that you can get even more servings when the roast is prepared this way. Simply purchase a traditional Rib Roast, and leave us a note in the comments section during checkout that you'd like the bones removed & tied back on.